Prime Minister condemns new security law and promises tailor-made visa for 2.9 million Hong Kongers The signing of the joint declaration sparked some controversy in Britain because British Conservative Party Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher agreed with the Chinese communist government, represented by Deng Xiaoping. [9] In the White Paper containing the joint statement, Her Majesty`s Government stated that “the alternative to the adoption of this Agreement is to have no agreement,” a statement intended to refute criticism that the statement has made too many concessions to China and highlights China`s considerable influence during the negotiations. [9] The transition has gone more or less well, although human rights issues and Beijing`s desire to strengthen political control occasionally lead to significant friction. Events since 2004 – particularly in the summer of 2019 – have shown that universal suffrage remains a rallying point for Hong Kongers, while the PRC is clearly reluctant to grant Hong Kong full political freedom. The communist press published stories that the project was a bad plan to drain itself of its blood in Hong Kong before the handover and leave the territory in heavy debts. [135] After three years of negotiations, Britain and the PRC finally reached an agreement on the construction of the new airport and signed a memorandum of understanding. [136] By eliminating the hills and recovering the land, the construction of the new airport took only a few years. After the deal, Britain began to implement a broader level of democracy in Hong Kong. Hong Kong`s first democratic government was formed in the late 1980s, consisting of functional electoral districts and direct elections.

The stability of these changes became doubtful after the Tiananmen Square incident (Beijing, China, June 3-4, 1989), when an unknown number of Protestant students were massacred. Half a million people in Hong Kong marched to protest. Hong Kong`s autonomy was guaranteed by the “One Country, Two Systems” agreement, enshrined in the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration, signed by Zhao Ziyang, then Chinese Prime Minister, and Margaret Thatcher, British Prime Minister. . . .